DNS and why it matters!

As some of you may have read, Google recently announced [][2] Google Public DNS.

What is DNS?

DNS is basically a way to convert between www.google.com and 74.125.53.100.
By default your DNS is likely done by your ISP. Comcast, or soemthing else.
There are a few reasons why you may want to change this to OpenDNS or Google Public DNS
  1. The faster DNS responds (by converting www.google.com to an ip address), the faster you can visit the intended website.
  2. If you mistype a website (such as www.gooogle.com) a good DNS will fix it, and still send you to the place you intended.
  3. A good DNS can help you by blocking phishing/spam or other dangerous sites.

    You can change the DNS on your computer (it differs depending on OS), but the best place to change it on is your router. Most computers (by default), use the gateway (which is usually your router) as the primary nameserver.

So, if your router’s ip address is 192.168.1.1, your computer will then use whatever DNS your router is using
    <div>
    </div>

    <div>
      To switch to a different DNS, simply go to your router&#8217;s configuration page and add the following ip address
    </div>

    <div>
      For OpenDNS add:</p> 

      <ul>
        <li>
          <b>208.67.220.220</b>
        </li>
        <li>
          <b>208.67.222.222</b>
        </li>
      </ul>

      <p>
        For Google Public DNS add:
      </p>

      <ul>
        <li>
          <span style="font-weight: bold;">8.8.8.8</span>
        </li>
        <li>
          <span style="font-weight: bold;">8.8.4.4</span>
        </li>
      </ul>

      <p>
        To test if you are running OpenDNS, check this page:<br />http://www.opendns.com/welcome/
      </p>

      <p>
        To check if you&#8217;re running Google DNS run this (in Linux): (<a href="http://groups.google.com/group/public-dns-discuss/browse_thread/thread/d22de0b08bed3b2c">taken from Wilmer van der Gaast, Dublin Traffic SRE. Google Ireland.</a>)
      </p>

      <blockquote>
        <p>
          dig +short self.myresolver.info
        </p>
      </blockquote>

      <p>
        You should get an ip address ending with .94<br />check that it&#8217;s Google by running a whois
      </p>

      <blockquote>
        <p>
          whois 74.125.154.94
        </p>
      </blockquote>

      <div>
      </div>

      <div>
      </div>

      <div>
      </div>

      <div>
        before deciding which DNS to add, you may want to run some benchmarks
      </div>

      <p>
        You can benchmark DNS using <a href="http://code.google.com/p/namebench/">namebench</a><br />Here are my results:</div> 

        <div>
          Mean response (in milliseconds):<br />&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8211;<br />OpenDNS ############################# 75.60<br />Comcast Denver U ##################################### 97.97<br />UltraDNS ##################################### 98.21<br />Lightningbolt Se ######################################### 109.94<br />NTT US ############################################ 117.20<br />Internal 192-1-1 ############################################## 121.22<br />BC.net CA ################################################ 126.94<br />Radiant CA ################################################# 129.70<br />Infinity Interne #################################################### 137.31<br />Clearwire WAR-1 ##################################################### 142.55</p> 

          <p>
            In my case, OpenDNS was significantly faster than the competition (including Google Public DNS).<br />I will keep using OpenDNS for now, but plan to keep an eye on Google. I wouldn&#8217;t be surprised if they improve substantially in the coming months. After all, Google has a lot of money to through at the problem.</div>